Phillippe Parreno Marquees

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While working for interactive scape GmbH, Jason designed, produced, and installed the electronic components in almost a dozen Marquees by artist Philippe Parreno. In the “Small Version of Guggenheim Marquee,” 2008, red incandescent bulbs sparkle in random patterns under red neon tubes, generating enough heat to warm the visitors below. Microcontrollers generate the patterns for the 231 flashing bulbs, drawing almost 18 Amps of current. The Marquee has been shown at Petzel Gallery, in New York, as well as at the Kunsthalle Zurich.

The large white “Marquee” hung above the entrance to Parreno's major 2009 retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, in Paris. Measuring an impressive 3.2m by 3.6m by 40cm, the work is internally lit by 16 fluorescent tubes, and externally lit by 42 white neon tubes and 196 incandescent bulbs. It looks as if it hangs by two glowing chains, which loop around a big blue air duct in the ceiling. The chains are comprised of semi-translucent acrylic segments, lit by 1,060 tiny white L.E.D.s. All of the lights are sequenced by a master controller via DMX protocol. The bulbs, programmed in a chase pattern like a sunburst, dim down and turn off when the Pompidou gallery, now transformed into a movie theatre, goes dark. After Parenno's film is screened, the Marquee lights up again in sections, first internally, like a ghost, then externally, with all of it's glittering lights. Jason designed the control scheme, was project manager during construction, and oversaw the installation of this work.